10 Surprising Things Kids Learn at Camp

10 Surprising Things Kids Learn at CampI would not be the person I am today without camp.
-15-year-old camper

My three decades of camp experience, coupled with my own and others’ research, have shaped my long-held opinion that camp experiences benefit children in profound ways. Yet even I was astounded by the revelations shared at our closing campfires last summer for the campers who were completing their final seasons as campers. These campfires were an emotional time to say goodbye to our high school kids heading into 10th grade.

After their counselors spoke about each of them and shared words of affirmation and encouragement, I asked the kids if they wanted to share anything they had learned at camp they might use throughout their lives. I knew we had a special gig going at camp, and that we were providing a positive, healthy community where kids could have fun, make friends, and grow, but I hadn’t heard the specific life lessons that they believed they learned at camp in such direct and heartfelt words spoken out loud.

Big SwingOur oldest campers shared that they learned how to be happy, “to just have fun and not worry so much.” In a time when so many young people struggle with depression and anxiety, it was heartwarming to hear that, for many of them, camp is their “happy place.”

better version of selfCampers also said they learned to be happy in their own skin, gaining confidence in their abilities, speaking up for things they believe in, and worrying less about what others think of them. “I have the freedom to be myself,” said one. Added another, “When I am at camp, I am a better version of myself than anywhere else on Earth.” Being their truest selves, they found, paved the way for them to meet new people and explore new friendships. “Camp has made me a more open and caring person,” said one. At camp, many said they experienced a sense of belonging they didn’t always feel in their schools.

ropes courseThis comfort at camp enabled them to take risks and conquer fears, and they challenged themselves in new and adventurous ways. It didn’t matter if they failed, they said, because they were surrounded by counselors and friends who supported them no matter the outcome. “I’ve learned that the magic happens,” said one, “outside of your comfort zone.”

But among the sentiments that cheered me most from those older campers was the idea that camp helped comfort zonethem learn to live in the moment, to enjoy where they were in the Great Outdoors, and not worry about Sailing at Campwhat the future held. Said one, “I found a passion for the outdoors I thought I would never have.” That’s passion for outdoorswhat tends to happen, of course, when kids are unplugged from their technology for a time. Experiences and relationships are more vibrant and real, and kids expressed how great it was to connect face-to-face. I really loved the way one camper put it: “When I was put in a cabin group with seven other random girls, we bonded really well and didn’t judge each other before we got to know them, because we had never seen each other’s social media profiles.”

I reflect back on those and other words and see that these 15-year-olds have wisdom that many adults have yet to acquire. Truly, I was blown away by what they said they learned at camp, and I could see in their spirits what one of them expressed: “Being at camp has influenced me to be a better person who wants to be a leader not a follower.” I feel honored to know these articulate, honest, and thoughtful young adults who do not fit the teenage stereotype and are far more mature than I was at their age. These kids chose sleeping outdoors over sleeping in and sitting around a campfire instead of hunching over their phones.

When I look back on those memorable campfires, I feel a deep gratitude for our oldest campers, the life-changing experiences they had at camp, and that I had the opportunity to play a small role in their learning. I am also grateful for the parents of these kids who were willing to share time with their children, and a piece of their childhoods, with our camp. And I am reminded, as a parent, that although there are many things I want my kids to learn—and I’d love to be their teacher—many of their best lessons will come from experiences apart from, and from someone other than, me.

 

2013 (4)

Thank you for reading my post!  If you like Sunshine Parenting, please subscribe to get an email update each time I post (use box in right column of my blog). Follow me on Facebook or Pinterest for links to other articles and ideas about camp and parenting. Have a happy day with your kids! 

Resources/Related Posts:
Benefits of Camp, American Camp Association
Five Reasons Great Parents Send their Kids to Camp
Parking Your Helicopter
All about Summer Camp

Sunshine

I'm blessed to have five great kids (ages 13-23) call me “Mom.” As a summer camp director for the past 30 years, I've also had the privilege of working with thousands of kids, college-age counselors, and parents. I follow the latest research and trends on parenting, education, and children’s development and love to share what I learn!

3 Comments

Leave a Reply

Get my FREE eBook 10 Friendship Skills Every Kid Needs.

Looking to help your kids improve their social skills?
Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a free copy of my eBook 10 Friendship Skills Every Kid Needs.
GET NOW
FEATURED DOWNLOAD -

Conflict Resolution Wheel

DOWNLOAD NOW
FEATURED DOWNLOAD -

Questions for Connection PDF

DOWNLOAD NOW

10 Friendship Skills Every Kid Needs

Looking to help your kids improve their social skills?

Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get a free copy of my eBook 10 Friendship Skills Every Kid Needs
.
GET NOW
FEATURED DOWNLOAD -

READY FOR ADULTHOOD CHECKLIST

DOWNLOAD NOW
%d bloggers like this: